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July 2021 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Update for July 2021
» Posture
» Gut Part 2
» May Ketogenic Info
» Coronavirus Info
» Your Microbiome/ Your Gut
» Your Core!
» Understanding Why Your Health History Is Critical to Excellent Chiropractic Care
» Are Arthritis Sufferers Hesitating to Pursue Relief?
» Stop Drinking Soda & Coffee for Energy – Climb the Stairs Instead!

Update for July 2021

Dear Patient,

Welcome to the middle of July!

I hope you are safe and well and enjoying some new freedoms. Things are continuing to open up in spite of the fear of the new variants.

Please remember that Vit D is also essential to fighting Covid and its variants as well as Magnesium, Zinc and Vit C. I have a previous article in this newsletter that goes into more detail.

Also, our highly qualified Nutritionist, Carolee Horner can give you all the info you need. She is ready to help you get on track with what you are consuming. Food is fuel. More about Carolee is on the way. She has already changed my life.

By the time you will get this, the BBQ's and celebration will be in the rear view mirror. I hope you had a great time and I look forward to continuing to serve you.

Regards,

 

Dr. Steven Saul

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul


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Posture

Many of us are getting into terrible positions on our cell phones and computers. It is going to be more important than ever to make sure we get into good posture!

When I was growing up I was told "Chest out, stomach in, shoulders back, etc, etc". The problem is that following that advice caused a lot of tension in my body.

Here is how to get in good posture. Stand up. Allow you head to float up toward the ceiling. Or if you like, imagine that a hook at the top of your head is pulling your head toward the ceiling. Don't force it. Let is rise or float up.

Next, find the area under the front of your sternum (breastbone).  Its about the height of the crease of your elbow.

Now find your belly button. When you bend over, these 2 points will get closer. What we want is for these to points to get further apart!  This will naturally bring your shoulders back properly without tensing.

Thats it. Now you must practice this standing, walking and sitting. When you realize you are slumping, just repeat this process. Keep repeating for the rest of your life!

 

Dr. Saul

 

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul


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Gut Part 2

Here is a link to copy and paste on another important aspect of healing the gut.

 

https://2mealday.com/article/how-intermittent-fasting-can-improve-gut-health/

 

Cheers,

 

Dr. Saul

Author: 2meal a day.com
Source: 2meal a day.com


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May Ketogenic Info

Its May. Welcome to springtime. This link wil take to you to an article on the vital importance of Fish Oils throught life.. It also discusses ketogenic diets and what kind of fats to eat. Enjoy!

 

https://blog.metagenics.com/post/2018/07/09/quality-fats-on-a-ketogenic-diet/?utm_campaign=Meta_Newsletter&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=72348292&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9P7ROU8VMh6cD6KJft5xbti3wi9x5RLEmxGO0Yxisw4L59eCQizp_l3fntlL0Z9eNlARRWh67-nDx8Tw6bCUMer6fykw&_hsmi=72348292

Author: Dr. Steven Saul/Metagenics
Source: Metagenics


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Coronavirus Info

Hi. There is a lot of concern and advice regarding the coronavirus and what to do about it. Corona virus symptoms are flu-like, with cough, fever, shortness of breath and sneezing. If you have unusual symptoms, please contact your primary care provider. There is a plethora of practical information on the internet. (Washing hands, wearing masks, not touching your face or eyes, etc).

Today, I want to go over some nutritional information that you may find extremely useful.

 

1. Make sure you are not low in Vit D!  Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to infection. Most people need about 5k units per day for maintainance, but something I have recently come across due to the outbreak scare is called the Vit D Hammer. 

This is a 1-time 50 000 IU dose of vitamin D3 or 10 000 IU 3 times daily for 2 to 3 days. According to the Doctors I have read, the results are dramatic, with complete resolution of symptoms in 48 to 72 hours.

2. Vit C also has anti-viral properties. 2-3 grams per day up to 8g/day when you have respiratory symptoms. If you get a loose bowel, back off it.

3. LDM is a very effective antiviral from Lomatia Root that I have used with great success for over 30 years. We always have some in our office.

4. Probiotics. The gut is the seat of the immune system. Make sure you get daily beneficial bacteria. 20-50 billion per day and if you have to take antibiotics you want to take 250 billion/day for 2 weeks following antibiotic therapy to resote normal gut flora.

5. Magnesium. Zinc and selenium have also been shown to help the body fight viral infections. Most people are lowere in Magnesium than they realize.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to call me at 404 252 0014 and discuss.

 

All the best,

 

Dr. Steven Saul

 

 

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul


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Your Microbiome/ Your Gut

5 Things that effect your Gut.....

 

The human gut contains trillions of bacteria – also referred to as the gut flora or microbiome – and these tiny unicellular organisms play an unfathomable role in overall health. For instance, a healthy gut flora has been shown to improve gut health, heart health, brain health, weight management and blood sugar regulation, among others.

While most of these thousands of bacterial species are friendly, others are not. The friendly ones have several benefits including aiding of digestion, vitamin K production, folate production and the destruction of harmful bacteria. However, certain day-to-day diet and lifestyle choices can negatively impact the population of these friendly bacteria – and by extension, overall health.

Here are five of such choices:

1. Not Eating a Wide Range of Foods

Gut flora diversity is of critical importance for a healthy microbiome, as it enhances recovery from harmful physiological disturbances. Unfortunately, over the past few decades, the bulk of the diversity that once pervaded the western diet has been lost due to the economic pressures associated with increased food production. And according to FAO, “75 percent of the world's food is now generated from only 12 plants and five animal species” and that isn’t very good for our microbiomes, especially since the western diet rarely even includes all of these food sources.

In a 2010 study that compared human intestinal microbiota from children characterized by a modern western diet and those on a rural diet (composed mainly of whole foods with high fiber content), the researchers found that the children on a rural diet had a more diverse gut flora and better gut health.

So, what do you do? Eat a more diverse array of foods – specifically whole foods. Unlike their highly-processed counterparts, whole foods generally contain a wider range of nutrients, which encourages the growth of diverse bacterial species.

2. Inadequate Prebiotic Consumption

Prebiotics are basically a kind of fiber that passes through the gut without being digested. And although eating this kind of fiber may seem like a waste of digestion time, it actually encourages the growth of friendly bacteria in the gut. For instance, high-fiber fruits such as apples – with indigestible pectin making up 50% of its total fiber content – has been shown to promote the growth of helpful microbes like Bifidobacteria.

A total lack of prebiotics in your diet may prove harmful to your digestive health, because it slows down the development and diversity of your gut flora. So, for proper microbiome development, you need to incorporate foods rich in partially digestible or indigestible fiber into your diet. Several foods in this category include oats, nuts, onions, garlic, leeks, asparagus, bananas, Jerusalem artichokes, lentils, chickpeas and beans.

Sticking to a well-structured, fiber-rich diet plan can be challenging so supplementing with prebiotic fibers may be an option. According to a study in 30 obese women, a daily intake of prebiotic supplements over a 3-month period significantly promoted the growth of Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium, which are highly beneficial bacteria.

3. Excessive Alcohol Consumption

You’ve probably heard how excessive alcohol consumption is bad for your liver, heart and brain, but what you probably didn’t know is that chronic alcohol consumption can also induce dysbiosis and affect gut health.

In a particular study that compared the gut flora of 41 alcoholics with those of 10 healthy individuals with little or no daily alcohol consumption, the researchers observed that 27% of the alcoholics suffered dysbiosis in their microbiome, while none of the non-alcoholics did.

In another study that compared the effects of three different kinds of alcohol – gin, red wine and de-alcoholized red wine – on gut health, it was observed that gin negatively affected the population of beneficial gut bacteria, while red wine improved it when consumed moderately. The beneficial effect of red wine can be attributed to its polyphenol content.

4. Inadequate Sleep

Sleep deprivation has been linked to various health problems including heart disease and obesity. Research now shows that sleep deprivation also affects your microbiome health. According to a 2016 study, which examined the effects of short-term partial sleep deprivation on gut microbiodata, the researchers observed that after two days of sleep deprivation (4 hours per night), some subtle but noticeable changes had occurred in the gut flora.

The sleep-deprived individuals showed “an increased Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio, higher abundances of the families Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae, and lower abundance of Tenericutes (all P < 0.05) – previously all associated with metabolic perturbations in animal or human models.”

For the sake of the microbiome, 6-9 hours of sleep each night is recommended. To achieve this, set and maintain a regular bed time, cut out caffeine at least 6 hours to your bedtime, and turn off the lights, especially any blue light from electronic devices.

5. Inadequate Exercise

Many people skip regular exercise for various reasons, but inadequate exercise perturbs multiple biological systems. Not only does it predispose us to weight gain, higher stress levels and a higher chance of developing a chronic disease, recent studies have shown it can also put your gut flora at a disadvantage.

According to a 2014 study published in Gut, the researchers found out that professional rugby players “had a higher diversity of gut microorganisms, representing 22 distinct phyla,” almost twice the figure observed in the control group matched for age, gender and body size.

In another study which examined the “differences in gut microbiota profile between women with active lifestyle and sedentary women,” the active women enjoyed a higher population of beneficial bacteria such as Bifidobacterium and Akkermansia. The study, therefore, concluded that regular exercise at low-to-moderate intensities helps the gut flora.

On a final note, if you really want to enjoy all the benefits a healthy microbiome can afford this 2019, then eat a wider range of whole foods, take more prebiotics, minimize alcohol consumption, sleep more and exercise regularly… your gut will thank you for it.

Author: Biotics Research
Source: Biotics Research


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports


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Understanding Why Your Health History Is Critical to Excellent Chiropractic Care

Chiropractors gather a new patient's full health history before the first round of care because it's crucial to providing not just the right care, but also the right chiropractic care. It's more than giving an adjustment. It's also about treating you as a whole. The human body is intricate and interconnected, making every last piece of your physical and mental health valuable. Missing information can thwart even the most experienced chiropractor's effort to help you heal.

Health History and Whole Body Chiropractic

Filling out that health history form is a necessary process. Your health history sets the stage for what kind of care you need. It also offers clues to health issues you might not be aware of, and helps your doctor arrive at the right conclusion when seeking a diagnosis. It’s critical to treating you as a whole instead of just your symptoms.

Health history reveals a lot about your lifestyle, too. For example, if you come in with neck pain and your health history shows a change in lifestyle that revolves around a desk job, which coincides with developing neck pain, not only can your chiropractor adjust chiropractic methods to meet your needs, s/he can offer you lifestyle guidance on how to prevent desk job-induced neck pain.

Health history also serves the purpose of identifying the root cause of your health issue(s). Say that same neck pain patient was also in a car accident a year previous to the appointment. That's going to trigger another set of questions to determine whether it was the car accident or the desk job causing neck pain. The true root cause determines the best way to treat you. Your chiropractor can make connections you might have never considered.

Your Emotional Health and Whole Body Chiropractic

Emotions manifest physically in so many ways. Positive emotions are life-giving while negative emotions can manifest as pain, hormone imbalances, impede organ function, give you headaches, rob you of sleep, upset your stomach, make you gain weight and so much more.

If a patient has so much pent up stress and anxiety, chiropractic doctors want to address that and make referrals as necessary. Sometimes a misalignment in the spine can lead to emotional distress, which then leads to physical ailments tied to where the misalignment is, like how high anxiety can give a person stomach issues. Addressing the root cause of your emotional imbalances can empower you to achieve true healing.

Chiropractic can help with emotional health in so many ways because of how it helps you physically. One of the most powerful ways is how the right adjustment in the right place can help restore proper neurological function. For example, that anxious patient with stomach issues likely has a lot of tension interfering with nerve signaling to the stomach. Chiropractic can help your body relax enough to curb anxiety and restore proper nerve signals, alleviating stomach issues in the process.

Your Current Health and Whole Body Chiropractic

Beyond the obvious that you’re at your trusted local chiropractor for obvious reasons, delving into your current health often unearths clues as to what’s going on. Candid conversations with your chiropractor help them get a better picture of what’s going on inside your body and gives them a better idea on how to best help you.

Your chiropractor wants to help you and connect you with the right care whenever your needs are best addressed by a different kind of health professional. There are so many ways chiropractic can do so much to help your body heal and achieve optimal health when they have the complete health history picture.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: ChiroPlanet.com


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Are Arthritis Sufferers Hesitating to Pursue Relief?

Arthritis is a serious and frustrating condition that affects tens of millions. This type of ailment can make a person’s daily routine much more difficult than it should be. Those afflicted with arthritis may have trouble lifting things, and they may even be inhibited from being mobile without facing serious pain. According to the CDC, more than 54 million adults in the US suffer from arthritis. The total number of afflicted individuals has increased by about 20 percent over the past 15 years. Not only is the condition's widespread prevalence concerning to the medical industry, but the lack of attention given to arthritis' status as a serious disability is also alarming.  One of the main reasons that people may be holding off on pursuing solutions for this condition is that the way to handle it can sometimes result in more pain in the short-term. A healthy amount of physical activity has been proven to help reduce arthritis pain. However, since exercise can be painful for someone who is already suffering from arthritis, some people avoid it altogether.  Though movement can be difficult for a person with this type of disability, it can be used to help ease the severity of the issue. The growing number of sufferers indicates that people are holding off on pursuing relief, though doing so could benefit them in the long-term.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: CDC, online March 7, 2017.


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Stop Drinking Soda & Coffee for Energy – Climb the Stairs Instead!

Drinking coffee first thing in the morning may seem like the logical way to perk up low energy levels. Researchers have found, though, that caffeine – either from soda, energy drinks, coffee, or tea – has less of an effect on a person’s energy as does physical activity. The physical activity promoted in this recent study: stair climbing. Climbing the stairs may be the last thing a person wants to do when they’ve had a long night, but according to a study in Reuters, taking the stairs has a more profound effect on energy than caffeine. The study followed young, busy women, as this is a demographic that is largely often sleep deprived. The women in the study averaged less than 6.5 hours of sleep each night. Some of the women were given a placebo, others a 50mg dose of caffeine, and the last group had to climb stairs for 10 minutes. After this, they were asked to describe their level of energy, and were also tested for cognitive awareness and function. This included testing their memory and reaction times. The women who climbed the stairs felt significantly more energized, particularly right after their exercise. According to Men’s Health, the activity didn’t reduce the participant’s cognitive function, which means that when a person exerts themselves physically they don’t exhaust themselves mentally. Medical News Today reports that the participants even had greater motivation to work after their jaunt up the stairs. So, after a sleepless night – ditch the caffeine and hit the stairs. You’ll feel better!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Physiology and Behavior, online March 14, 2017.


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