February 2020 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Your Microbiome/ Your Gut
» Posture
» Gut Part 2
» May Ketogenic Info
» Your Core!
» Chiropractors on Capitol Hill Push for Improved Coverage for Medicare Beneficiaries
» Electric Bikes and Scooters Associated with Severe Injuries
» Most Sustained Weight Loss Lowers Women’s Breast Cancer Risk

Your Microbiome/ Your Gut

5 Things that effect your Gut.....

 

The human gut contains trillions of bacteria – also referred to as the gut flora or microbiome – and these tiny unicellular organisms play an unfathomable role in overall health. For instance, a healthy gut flora has been shown to improve gut health, heart health, brain health, weight management and blood sugar regulation, among others.

While most of these thousands of bacterial species are friendly, others are not. The friendly ones have several benefits including aiding of digestion, vitamin K production, folate production and the destruction of harmful bacteria. However, certain day-to-day diet and lifestyle choices can negatively impact the population of these friendly bacteria – and by extension, overall health.

Here are five of such choices:

1. Not Eating a Wide Range of Foods

Gut flora diversity is of critical importance for a healthy microbiome, as it enhances recovery from harmful physiological disturbances. Unfortunately, over the past few decades, the bulk of the diversity that once pervaded the western diet has been lost due to the economic pressures associated with increased food production. And according to FAO, “75 percent of the world's food is now generated from only 12 plants and five animal species” and that isn’t very good for our microbiomes, especially since the western diet rarely even includes all of these food sources.

In a 2010 study that compared human intestinal microbiota from children characterized by a modern western diet and those on a rural diet (composed mainly of whole foods with high fiber content), the researchers found that the children on a rural diet had a more diverse gut flora and better gut health.

So, what do you do? Eat a more diverse array of foods – specifically whole foods. Unlike their highly-processed counterparts, whole foods generally contain a wider range of nutrients, which encourages the growth of diverse bacterial species.

2. Inadequate Prebiotic Consumption

Prebiotics are basically a kind of fiber that passes through the gut without being digested. And although eating this kind of fiber may seem like a waste of digestion time, it actually encourages the growth of friendly bacteria in the gut. For instance, high-fiber fruits such as apples – with indigestible pectin making up 50% of its total fiber content – has been shown to promote the growth of helpful microbes like Bifidobacteria.

A total lack of prebiotics in your diet may prove harmful to your digestive health, because it slows down the development and diversity of your gut flora. So, for proper microbiome development, you need to incorporate foods rich in partially digestible or indigestible fiber into your diet. Several foods in this category include oats, nuts, onions, garlic, leeks, asparagus, bananas, Jerusalem artichokes, lentils, chickpeas and beans.

Sticking to a well-structured, fiber-rich diet plan can be challenging so supplementing with prebiotic fibers may be an option. According to a study in 30 obese women, a daily intake of prebiotic supplements over a 3-month period significantly promoted the growth of Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium, which are highly beneficial bacteria.

3. Excessive Alcohol Consumption

You’ve probably heard how excessive alcohol consumption is bad for your liver, heart and brain, but what you probably didn’t know is that chronic alcohol consumption can also induce dysbiosis and affect gut health.

In a particular study that compared the gut flora of 41 alcoholics with those of 10 healthy individuals with little or no daily alcohol consumption, the researchers observed that 27% of the alcoholics suffered dysbiosis in their microbiome, while none of the non-alcoholics did.

In another study that compared the effects of three different kinds of alcohol – gin, red wine and de-alcoholized red wine – on gut health, it was observed that gin negatively affected the population of beneficial gut bacteria, while red wine improved it when consumed moderately. The beneficial effect of red wine can be attributed to its polyphenol content.

4. Inadequate Sleep

Sleep deprivation has been linked to various health problems including heart disease and obesity. Research now shows that sleep deprivation also affects your microbiome health. According to a 2016 study, which examined the effects of short-term partial sleep deprivation on gut microbiodata, the researchers observed that after two days of sleep deprivation (4 hours per night), some subtle but noticeable changes had occurred in the gut flora.

The sleep-deprived individuals showed “an increased Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio, higher abundances of the families Coriobacteriaceae and Erysipelotrichaceae, and lower abundance of Tenericutes (all P < 0.05) – previously all associated with metabolic perturbations in animal or human models.”

For the sake of the microbiome, 6-9 hours of sleep each night is recommended. To achieve this, set and maintain a regular bed time, cut out caffeine at least 6 hours to your bedtime, and turn off the lights, especially any blue light from electronic devices.

5. Inadequate Exercise

Many people skip regular exercise for various reasons, but inadequate exercise perturbs multiple biological systems. Not only does it predispose us to weight gain, higher stress levels and a higher chance of developing a chronic disease, recent studies have shown it can also put your gut flora at a disadvantage.

According to a 2014 study published in Gut, the researchers found out that professional rugby players “had a higher diversity of gut microorganisms, representing 22 distinct phyla,” almost twice the figure observed in the control group matched for age, gender and body size.

In another study which examined the “differences in gut microbiota profile between women with active lifestyle and sedentary women,” the active women enjoyed a higher population of beneficial bacteria such as Bifidobacterium and Akkermansia. The study, therefore, concluded that regular exercise at low-to-moderate intensities helps the gut flora.

On a final note, if you really want to enjoy all the benefits a healthy microbiome can afford this 2019, then eat a wider range of whole foods, take more prebiotics, minimize alcohol consumption, sleep more and exercise regularly… your gut will thank you for it.

Author: Biotics Research
Source: Biotics Research


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Posture

Many of us are getting into terrible positions on our cell phones and computers. It is going to be more important than ever to make sure we get into good posture!

When I was growing up I was told "Chest out, stomach in, shoulders back, etc, etc". The problem is that following that advice caused a lot of tension in my body.

Here is how to get in good posture. Stand up. Allow you head to float up toward the ceiling. Or if you like, imagine that a hook at the top of your head is pulling your head toward the ceiling. Don't force it. Let is rise or float up.

Next, find the area under the front of your sternum (breastbone).  Its about the height of the crease of your elbow.

Now find your belly button. When you bend over, these 2 points will get closer. What we want is for these to points to get further apart!  This will naturally bring your shoulders back properly without tensing.

Thats it. Now you must practice this standing, walking and sitting. When you realize you are slumping, just repeat this process. Keep repeating for the rest of your life!

 

Dr. Saul

 

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul


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Gut Part 2

Here is a link to copy and paste on another important aspect of healing the gut.

 

https://2mealday.com/article/how-intermittent-fasting-can-improve-gut-health/

 

Cheers,

 

Dr. Saul

Author: 2meal a day.com
Source: 2meal a day.com


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May Ketogenic Info

Its May. Welcome to springtime. This link wil take to you to an article on the vital importance of Fish Oils throught life.. It also discusses ketogenic diets and what kind of fats to eat. Enjoy!

 

https://blog.metagenics.com/post/2018/07/09/quality-fats-on-a-ketogenic-diet/?utm_campaign=Meta_Newsletter&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=72348292&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9P7ROU8VMh6cD6KJft5xbti3wi9x5RLEmxGO0Yxisw4L59eCQizp_l3fntlL0Z9eNlARRWh67-nDx8Tw6bCUMer6fykw&_hsmi=72348292

Author: Dr. Steven Saul/Metagenics
Source: Metagenics


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports


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Chiropractors on Capitol Hill Push for Improved Coverage for Medicare Beneficiaries

More than 700 chiropractors and chiropractic students from across the nation gathered in Washington, D.C. today to urge Congress to support H.R. 3654, legislation that would give Medicare beneficiaries improved coverage of non-drug services for pain relief, potentially helping some to avoid using prescription opioid pain medications.  Boosting support for H.R. 3654, the Chiropractic Medicare Coverage Modernization Act, was a focus this year at the American Chiropractic Association’s (ACA) annual meeting and advocacy event, ACA Engage.  The bipartisan bill would enable beneficiaries to more easily access the chiropractic profession's broad-based, non-drug approach to pain management.  During a kick-off event, ACA President Robert C. Jones, DC, told attendees, "You are intimately familiar with the issues facing your patients.  No one is better to deliver that message [to Capitol Hill]." Dr. Jones was followed by John Rosa, DC, a nationally recognized expert on the opioid crisis who serves as a consultant to the White House and federal agencies.  Dr. Rosa discussed the positive response to chiropractic he has received in healthcare policy circles where solutions to the opioid crisis are discussed.  "We are part of this solution," he noted.  Dr. Rosa said that chiropractors can offer the added advantage of prevention and health promotion services, such as advice on diet, exercise and injury prevention, which can potentially help patients prevent pain before it starts.  "Lifestyle and pain management.  We are that missing piece, and we have been for a long time," he said. Speaker Bonnie S. Hillsberg, DC, MHA, MEd, of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Division of Tribal Affairs, explained that opioids are a major problem in the Native American/Alaskan Native community as well, and that chiropractic services can be an important tool in alleviating their reliance on pain medications.  "Non-drug approaches have become an important strategy in stemming the national problem of opioid overuse and abuse," she said.  Rounding out the morning's line up was Christine Goertz, DC, PhD, chair of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), established as part of the Affordable Care Act to fund research to help patients, caregivers, and healthcare practitioners make evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare decisions.  Dr. Goertz said that she is encouraged not only by ongoing research into chiropractic's effectiveness but also emerging trends in health care that emphasize providers working collaboratively to help patients.  Additionally, ACA Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Advocacy John Falardeau presented the ACA's Congressional Health Care Leadership Award to Jessica Burnell, a health care policy advisor in the office of Rep. Brian Higgins (D-N.Y.), lead sponsor of H.R. 3654.  ACA Engage is the premier national conference for doctors of chiropractic, chiropractic assistants and chiropractic students.  ACA Engage (formerly called NCLC) has a long history of bringing together industry leaders from all over the country to meet with members of Congress on Capitol Hill.  The program has expanded to also include a robust variety of education offerings (with CE credits available), speeches from respected thought leaders and panel discussions that delve into important topics.  The new name reflects the association’s efforts to position the chiropractic profession for success by engaging a new generation of doctors with these exciting education, career and leadership development opportunities.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: Acatoday.com. January 30, 2020


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Electric Bikes and Scooters Associated with Severe Injuries

Electric bikes (commonly referred to as "E-bikes") and powered scooters are growing in popularity and as a result, their associated injuries are on the rise.  Unfortunately, the pattern of injuries resulting from the use of these powered wheeled devices is more severe than their non-electric and non-powered counterparts.  According to 2000 to 2017 data from the US National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, the injury data showed: 

  • E-bike injuries were more likely include internal injuries and require hospital admission
  • E-bike injuries were more than 3 times more likely to involve a collision with a pedestrian than either pedal bicycles or powered scooters
  • E-bike injuries have been increasing dramatically, especially among older persons
  • Powered scooter injuries were nearly 3 times more likely to result in concussion 

Be smart and be aware.  If you decide to use an electric/powered scooter or bike, be cautious and wear the appropriate safety equipment, including a properly fitted helmet as well as knee, elbow and if applicable, wrist guards.  Eye protection and appropriate clothing should additionally be considered. 

Did you know doctors of chiropractic are specifically trained in the diagnosis and care of soft tissue injuries?  If you have sustained an injury from an E-bike, scooter or any other wheeled equipment, call us today!  We can quickly diagnosis and care for you and your injury, getting you back to healthy and happy, safely and quickly!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Injury Prevention, online November 11, 2019.


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Most Sustained Weight Loss Lowers Women’s Breast Cancer Risk

Women 50 years and older who lose a modest amount of weight and keep it off can reduce their risk for acquiring breast cancer, according to researchers.  Researchers set out to identify if weight loss in women 50+ would reduce their risk of breast cancer.  Weight loss was defined as 4 pounds or more lost and maintained over a 10-year period. Data from more than 180,000 women was evaluated.  Compared with women with stable weight during study period, women with sustained weight loss had a lower risk of breast cancer.  Researchers concludes, "These results suggest that sustained weight loss, even modest amounts, is associated with lower breast cancer risk for women aged ≥50 years. Breast cancer prevention may be a strong weight loss motivator for the two-thirds of American women who are overweight or obese."

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, online December 17, 2019.


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