September 2016 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» September
» Posture
» Brain Chemicals
» Adrenal Fatigue
» Your Core!
» Metabolic Syndrome?
» Heat-Related Sports Injuries: When Athletes Are At Greatest Risk
» Are Trampoline Parks Safe for Kids?
» Preventing Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries: Proof That Bike Helmets Really Work

September

We hope you had a great Labor Day weekend! PLease enjoy this months articles...

 

As always, it is our pleasure to serve you!

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2016


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Posture

Many of us are getting into terrible positions on our cell phones and computers. It is going to be more important than ever to make sure we get into good posture!

When I was growing up I was told "Chest out, stomach in, shoulders back, etc, etc". The problem is that following that advice caused a lot of tension in my body.

Here is how to get in good posture. Stand up. Allow you head to float up toward the ceiling. Or if you like, imagine that a hook at the top of your head is pulling your head toward the ceiling. Don't force it. Let is rise or float up.

Next, find the area under the front of your sternum (breastbone).  Its about the height of the crease of your elbow.

Now find your belly button. When you bend over, these 2 points will get closer. What we want is for these to points to get further apart!  This will naturally bring your shoulders back properly without tensing.

Thats it. Now you must practice this standing, walking and sitting. When you realize you are slumping, just repeat this process. Keep repeating for the rest of your life!

 

Dr. Saul

 

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2015


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Brain Chemicals

Are you feeling more depressed than you think you should? Has your get up and go, got up and went? If so, you may be low in particular brain chemicals like Serotonin, GABA, Tyrosine or DPA.

Low Serotonin will make you feel like you are living under a dark cloud, while low tyrosine( an amino acid) will leave you feeling like you have the blah's. You may feel stressed out and could use some GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid). GABA acts to make the body more tranquil.  If you feel too sensitive to life's pains, you may be low in endorphins. This can be raised by a supplement call DPA. The good new is that these supplements may work as well or better than the common anti-depressants you see on TV with less side-effects!

If you would like to find out more, call LIly and she will send you the brain chemical analysis worksheet.

All the best,

Dr., Saul

PS..My son is getting married on Saturday the 5th of October and I am excited!

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul, The Mood Cure, Julia Ross
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2013


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Adrenal Fatigue
Are you suffering with Adrenal fatigue? Here are the common signs.
1. Difficulty getting up in the morning.
2. Mid morning low.
3. You feel better after the noon meal.
4. You have an afternoon low.
5. You feel better from 6 to 9:30 pm and get a second wind from 11pm to 1:30am.
6. You feel better if you can sleep in an extra 2 hours in the morning.

Other common signs are low bloods sugar or hypoglycemia, craving sweets and/or salty foods, difficulty sleeping, lowered libido, taking longer to recover from illness or stress, respiratory problems that come back too soon, a feeling of overwhelm or mild depression and difficulty concentrating
There are multiple causes of adrenal fatigue, but the most common is prolonged periods of stress or acute injuries like auto accidents.

The good news is that we can help. If you think you are suffering from adrenal fatigue, call us to see if we can provide a way back to being the person you know yourself to be!

The most common groups of people who suffer from this are caregivers, social workers, police, doctors, nurses, single moms, lawyers and people working 2 jobs. Self employed people are likely candidates as well.
 

All the best,

Dr. Saul



Author: Dr. Steven Saul via Dr. James L Wilson
Source: ChiroEco No9 6/13
Copyright: Dr Steven Saul 2013


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Metabolic Syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome is a disorder of energy utilization and storage, diagnosed by a co-occurrence of 3 out of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal (central) obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density cholesterol (HDL) levels. Some studies have shown the prevalence  in the USA to be an estimated 34% of the adult population, and the prevalence increases with age.

Metabolic syndrome is also known as metabolic syndrome X, cardiometabolic syndrome, syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome, Reaven's syndrome, and CHAOS (in Australia).

Metabolic syndrome and prediabetes appears to be the same disorder, just diagnosed by a different set of biomarkers.

Your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke increases with the number of metabolic risk factors you have. In general, a person who has metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop heart disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone who doesn't have metabolic syndrome.

If you think you have this condition, we can help! Call us for information on the best supplements and dietary changes to help this condition!

All the best,
Dr. Saul

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Wikipedia, NIH
Copyright: Wikipedia, NIH 2014


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Heat-Related Sports Injuries: When Athletes Are At Greatest Risk

Football season for high school and college students typically starts in September, one of the hottest months of the year around the US. A recent study conducted at the University of Georgia found that the likelihood of heat-related injury in athletes increased exponentially during this time of year. 

2 Times When the Risk of Sports Injuries Are the Highest

According to the study, researchers found that there were two times during training when athletes were at the highest risk for injuries.
 •  Within the first 3 to 14 days of practice, but the rate was much higher during the first three days
 •  On days seven and eight of pre-season training when athletes began practicing twice each day. 

Seventy-four percent of the college athletes evaluated suffered from heat cramps, while 26 percent suffered from a combination of heat syncope (fainting) and heat exhaustion. The highest risk came when outdoor temperatures were greater than 82 degrees. 

Common Symptoms of Heat-Related Sports Injuries

Coaches, trainers, parents and athletes should all be on the lookout for injuries related to higher temperatures. Symptoms include: 
 •  Heat Cramps: Involuntary spasms within the larger muscle groups. 
 •  Heat Exhaustion: Heat cramps, copious sweating, nausea, vomiting, headache and weakness. 
 •  Heat Stroke: Headache, rapid heart rate and breathing, nausea, vomiting, and altered behavior or mental state. 

Chiropractors: Helping Prevent Heat-Related Injury in Athletes

Chiropractors, as well as sports trainers, play an important role in preventing sports injuries during the summer training period. They can educate athletes on the importance of adequate hydration and rest. Additionally, they can demonstrate relaxation and flexibility techniques that can be used to relieve muscle spasms. When athletes and their sports medicine team, including chiropractors, work together they can prevent injuries and have a productive and healthy football season.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of Athletic Training, online August 9, 2016.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2016


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Are Trampoline Parks Safe for Kids?

When a new trampoline park opens up, emergency rooms and pediatric centers nearby are sure to notice an increase in related injuries. The safety concerns of trampolines are no secret, accounting for over 100,000 injuries each year.1  These injuries can range from mild to severe, from sprains and bruises to life-threatening spine and neck injuries. There's even a recoil injury doctors are all-too-familiar with: it’s called a "trampoline fracture," which is a tibial fracture commonly caused by having more than one jumper on a trampoline at once.2 Bur recent research illustrates that trampoline parks create even more risk than their standalone counterparts. First, they are built to accommodate many jumpers, and although parks' rules dictate only one jumper per "section," these rules are often broken. The hard supports between sectioned components of the trampolines themselves pose a serious risk as well, and they are common culprits for high-impact injuries after a fall.  At trampoline parks, jumpers are more likely to collide with others, more likely to sustain dislocations, and more likely to require hospital admission than jumpers on home trampolines.3  If a child is going to jump on a trampoline, practicing good safety skills like supervised, netted jumping with only one jumper at a time, as well as appropriately managing any injuries in the event of an accident, is the best way to keep safe them during these activities. And over half of injuries sustained from trampoline activities are soft tissue injuries,4 highlighting the importance of proper injury treatment and care.  For non-life threatening spinal and soft tissue injuries, treatment by a doctor of chiropractic is an excellent, effective, and safe way to heal an injury, strengthen the body, and protect from re-injury.
References: 
1. http://www.livestrong.com/article/347980-statistics-on-trampoline-injuries/
2. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/trampoline-fracture
3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27482060
4. http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/early/2016/07/28/injuryprev-2016-042071

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/early/2016/07/28/injuryprev-2016-042071
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2016


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Preventing Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries: Proof That Bike Helmets Really Work

There has been a debate over the years about whether bike helmets really do that much to prevent injuries. Advocates claim that wearing a helmet while riding a bike can save lives. Skeptics, however, don’t think that this type of protective gear does that much to prevent head injuries, let alone death.  Recently, a study was conducted at the University of Arizona to determine just how effective helmet protection really was for riders.

3 Ways Bike Helmets Protect Riders

During the course of this study, over 6000 bike accident patients were evaluated. Researchers found that helmets did, in fact, protect riders in three important ways. Helmets protected riders from: 
1. Severe Traumatic Brain Injures (TBIs)
2. Facial fractures
3. Death, even after a brain hemorrhage.

The Great Debate: The Numbers Prove That Helmets Are Beneficial

The figures gathered during this study are proof that helmets do a good job of protecting riders. For instance, wearing a helmet reduced the odds of severe traumatic brain injuries by over 50 percent. The likelihood of death after a bike accident was reduced by almost 45 percent in helmeted riders. And, these riders were over 30 percent less likely to experience facial fractures.  While not all helmeted riders are going to avoid traumatic brain injuries after an accident, helmets can reduce the probability of severe injury and death. The numbers speak for themselves; helmets do much to protect the rider. 

Chiropractors Can Be Strong Advocates for Rider Protection

Chiropractors are promoters of health and want to do all they can to help their patients live a happy, injury-free lifestyle. One of the ways they do this is by educating their patients on injury prevention, which includes the use of bike helmets.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The American Journal of Surgery, online July 29, 2016
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2016


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