May 2015 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Chiropractic For Tension Headaches
» Adrenal Fatigue
» Your Core!
» Brain Chemicals
» Metabolic Syndrome?
» Research Calls for Conservative Treatments Before Painkillers for Low-Back Pain
» Mediterranean Diets With Olive Oil and/or Nuts Improve Brain Health

Chiropractic For Tension Headaches

A good portion of those seeking chiropractic care do so for the relief from headaches. Of all the different types of headache, tension headaches are the most common representing approximately 60% of all headaches. Tension headaches are caused by the sustained contraction of the muscles in the neck and head region. Sufferers experience a constant tight or pressure sensation with mild to moderate pain, generally feeling like a tight band is wrapping around the head, lasting from hours to days. According to a new Danish study, tension headache sufferers exhibit neck and shoulder strength up to 26% weaker than in non-sufferers. Also found in those with tension headaches were muscle imbalances between sets of muscles that hold the head straight. Researchers weren’t sure whether the measured muscle weaknesses and imbalances were the result of the tension headaches or a cause of them. The good news is that most chiropractors have great success treating tension headaches. Biomechanical imbalances of the cervical and upper thoracic spine, and, muscle weakness and dysfunction are all things most chiropractors evaluate when treating tension headaches. Chiropractic adjustments along with stretching and strengthening exercises are commonly utilized with much success. If you believe you’re suffering from tension headaches, call your local chiropractor today!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: 
Cephalalgia, online April 1, 2015.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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Adrenal Fatigue
Are you suffering with Adrenal fatigue? Here are the common signs.
1. Difficulty getting up in the morning.
2. Mid morning low.
3. You feel better after the noon meal.
4. You have an afternoon low.
5. You feel better from 6 to 9:30 pm and get a second wind from 11pm to 1:30am.
6. You feel better if you can sleep in an extra 2 hours in the morning.

Other common signs are low bloods sugar or hypoglycemia, craving sweets and/or salty foods, difficulty sleeping, lowered libido, taking longer to recover from illness or stress, respiratory problems that come back too soon, a feeling of overwhelm or mild depression and difficulty concentrating
There are multiple causes of adrenal fatigue, but the most common is prolonged periods of stress or acute injuries like auto accidents.

The good news is that we can help. If you think you are suffering from adrenal fatigue, call us to see if we can provide a way back to being the person you know yourself to be!

The most common groups of people who suffer from this are caregivers, social workers, police, doctors, nurses, single moms, lawyers and people working 2 jobs. Self employed people are likely candidates as well.
 

All the best,

Dr. Saul



Author: Dr. Steven Saul via Dr. James L Wilson
Source: ChiroEco No9 6/13
Copyright: Dr Steven Saul 2013


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Brain Chemicals

Are you feeling more depressed than you think you should? Has your get up and go, got up and went? If so, you may be low in particular brain chemicals like Serotonin, GABA, Tyrosine or DPA.

Low Serotonin will make you feel like you are living under a dark cloud, while low tyrosine( an amino acid) will leave you feeling like you have the blah's. You may feel stressed out and could use some GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid). GABA acts to make the body more tranquil.  If you feel too sensitive to life's pains, you may be low in endorphins. This can be raised by a supplement call DPA. The good new is that these supplements may work as well or better than the common anti-depressants you see on TV with less side-effects!

If you would like to find out more, call LIly and she will send you the brain chemical analysis worksheet.

All the best,

Dr., Saul

PS..My son is getting married on Saturday the 5th of October and I am excited!

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul, The Mood Cure, Julia Ross
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2013


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Metabolic Syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome is a disorder of energy utilization and storage, diagnosed by a co-occurrence of 3 out of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal (central) obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density cholesterol (HDL) levels. Some studies have shown the prevalence  in the USA to be an estimated 34% of the adult population, and the prevalence increases with age.

Metabolic syndrome is also known as metabolic syndrome X, cardiometabolic syndrome, syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome, Reaven's syndrome, and CHAOS (in Australia).

Metabolic syndrome and prediabetes appears to be the same disorder, just diagnosed by a different set of biomarkers.

Your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke increases with the number of metabolic risk factors you have. In general, a person who has metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop heart disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone who doesn't have metabolic syndrome.

If you think you have this condition, we can help! Call us for information on the best supplements and dietary changes to help this condition!

All the best,
Dr. Saul

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Wikipedia, NIH
Copyright: Wikipedia, NIH 2014


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Research Calls for Conservative Treatments Before Painkillers for Low-Back Pain

Arlington, Va. – The American Chiropractic Association (ACA), in response to recent research calling into question the efficacy of acetaminophen in the management of spinal pain, strongly encourages patients and healthcare providers to consider the benefits of a conservative approach to back pain. According to the British Medical Journal study, the widely used painkiller is ineffective against low-back pain and offers only "minimal short-term benefit" for people with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. Similar conclusions were reached in a study published in The Lancet in July 2014, that acetaminophen "does not ease low-back pain."
 
"People need complete information about their treatment options," said ACA President Anthony Hamm, DC. "Research supports the use of more conservative treatments as a first-line defense against pain. This sensible approach not only reduces healthcare costs, but may also help some patients avoid riskier treatments altogether."
 
A "conservative care first" approach to health care encourages emphasis on more cost-effective and safer approaches over potentially addictive medications for pain management and health enhancement. Conservative management of painful conditions may include chiropractic manipulation combined with exercise and stretching prior to moving on to high-risk procedures. Chiropractic physicians are the highest-rated healthcare practitioners for low-back pain treatments due to their patient-centered, whole-person approach that provides greater interaction and communication for appropriate diagnosis and development of more cost-effective treatment plans.
 
"There are effective, more conservative treatments that help many patients lessen reliance on addictive painkillers and get back to their normal lives and activities," said Dr. Hamm. "The services provided by chiropractic physicians are not only clinically effective but also cost-effective, so taking a more conservative approach at the onset of low-back pain can also potentially save both patients and the healthcare system money down the line."
 
Numerous recent studies have clearly shown the dangerous overreliance in the United States on prescription painkillers. This has tremendously increased Americans’ risk for overuse, and abuse of these drugs if taken for long periods, leading to more than 17,000 related deaths in 2010 (more than heroin and cocaine combined). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls the abuse of prescription pain medications an "epidemic."

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: Acatoday.org, online April 10, 2015.
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association 2015


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Mediterranean Diets With Olive Oil and/or Nuts Improve Brain Health

Looking to enhance your brain function and improve memory? New research out of Barcelona, Spain indicates a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil and/or mixed nuts can do just that. Researchers randomly assigned 447 healthy aging individuals (average age 67) who were considered at high risk for a cardiovascular complication to 3 different dietary groups - A Mediterranean diet group supplemented with extra virgin olive oil (1 liter per week), a Mediterranean diet group supplemented with mixed nuts (30 grams per day), or a control diet group where participants were advised to reduce dietary fat. All participants received cognitive function tests at the beginning of the study, and those remaining in the study (approximately 75%) after approximately 4 years received the testing again. In general, participants consuming the low-fat control diet experienced a significant decrease in memory and cognitive function. Conversely, participants consuming the Mediterranean diet with nuts experienced significant improvements in memory, while those adding extra virgin olive oil experienced significantly better cognitive function. Both nuts and olive oil contain oleic acid which is one of the most common fats making up the brain which is 70% fat and is dependent upon getting its nourishment from the foods we eat. The antioxidant-rich foods in Mediterranean diets as well as nuts and olive oil provide nourishment to the brain and appear to help protect against overall brain health and cognitive decline.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Internal Medicine, online May 11, 2015.

Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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