Dr. Steven Saul, D.C.
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Mon *9:30am to 6:30pm, #NMT, AC
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Wed *9:30am to 6:30pm, AC
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Fri *9:30am to 6:00pm, AC
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*Dr. Saul- chiropractic **NA- Nutritional Assessments with Dr. Saul are by appointment only Call 404-252-0014 for scheduling. #Neuro-Muscular Massage Therapy (NMT) is available Monday, Tuesday, & Saturday by appointment only AC- Acupuncture with Josh Saul LAc Monday-Thursday 10am-6pm & Fridays 10am-2pm

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December 2014 Health Newsletter

Print-Friendly Newsletter

Current Articles

» December News
» Adrenal Fatigue
» Your Core!
» Brain Chemicals
» Metabolic Syndrome?
» Tips To Stay Healthy During The Holiday Season
» Chiropractic Profession Honors Veterans for Their Service
» Increased Weight... Increased Cancer Risk

December News

Hi!

The clinic enjoyed a wonderful Patient Appreciation Day on November 18th. Many thanks to all who came out. Congrats to the winners of the 2 one hour massages and Acupuncture treatments! Kenyata provided complimentary ten minute chair massages and I saw some happy people leave her chair. Congrats to the winner of the beautiful hand made cuff bracelet which was donated by my wife Susan.  Susan also made delicious Turkey Chili and home made Squash Soup to go along with Joshua's home made corn muffins and mulled cider. Of course, Lily was there to make sure it all went smoothly! Thanks again to all who made it a big success. If I left anyone out, I apologize! We all had a great time.

HOLIDAY HOURS

Dr. Saul will be out of the office the from the 15th to the 19th of December. He will be available for appointments Monday before Christmas and the Friday after Christmas as well. He will also be available on Monday and Friday the week after Christmas before returning to his regular schedule.

Acupuncture appointments will be available Mon, Tues and Wednesday before Christmas and the following week Josh will have the same schedule.

Massage Therapy is also available. Please call Lily for available appointment times.

All of us here at the clinic wish you a warm and fulfilling holiday season and a happy and healthy New Years.

All the best,'


Dr. Saul


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2014


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Adrenal Fatigue

Are you suffering with Adrenal fatigue? Here are the common signs.
1. Difficulty getting up in the morning.
2. Mid morning low.
3. You feel better after the noon meal.
4. You have an afternoon low.
5. You feel better from 6 to 9:30 pm and get a second wind from 11pm to 1:30am.
6. You feel better if you can sleep in an extra 2 hours in the morning.

Other common signs are low bloods sugar or hypoglycemia, craving sweets and/or salty foods, difficulty sleeping, lowered libido, taking longer to recover from illness or stress, respiratory problems that come back too soon, a feeling of overwhelm or mild depression and difficulty concentrating.

There are multiple causes of adrenal fatigue, but the most common is prolonged periods of stress or acute injuries like auto accidents.

The most common groups of people who suffer from this are caregivers, social workers, police, doctors, nurses, single moms, lawyers and people working 2 jobs. Self employed people are likely candidates as well.

The good news is that we can help. If you think you are suffering from adrenal fatigue, call us to see if we can provide a way back to being the person you know yourself to be!

All the best,

Dr. Saul

Author: Dr. Steven Saul via Dr. James L Wilson
Source: ChiroEco No9 6/13
Copyright: Dr Steven Saul 2013


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Your Core!


Hi! This is so important, I may leave this up permanently!

Lets talk about Core strength. You hear this term a lot. So what exactly is your core? Here is what you need to know.

You are made of Bones, Muscles, Tendons, Ligaments, and Fascia. If there is a breakdown in any of these systems you will have a loss of function which will lead to pain and dis-ease. We evaluate your body to find out the source of the problem.


What are the Core Muscles named and why are they so Important?

 
The core is made of all the muscles that ultimately attach to the pelvis.  These muscles can be divided into two sections based on their anatomical functions. One provides stabilization and the others provide movement.

    1. Deep stabilization system
    2. Superficial movement system


Anatomically, the muscles that are deeper in the body work more to stabilize the pelvis and spine, and the muscles that are located more superficially are more important for moving the pelvis and spine.

1. Deep Stabilization System


Core Training places a lot of emphasis on working the deep muscles of the core. Research shows that the deep muscles contract first before any movement is initiated. The body is brilliant!  It is wired to be stable first before it engages action.

The deep muscles are close to the spine and pelvis and they can help to move the body, but their primary role is to stabilize the pelvis and lower back. This protects these areas and gives you a strong foundation for the upcoming activity.

The core muscles that make the deep stabilization system are:

The transversus abdominus is one of the most important core muscles. It attaches to the pubic bone and fascia in the front. It compresses the abdominal contents, thus adding stability to the lower back and pelvis.

The lumbar multifidus runs on an angle and it helps with rotational stability. Research shows that people with chronic lower back pain have significant atrophy (wasting away) of the multifidus.

The pelvic floor muscles connect the sacrum and pelvis to the pubic bone. Their primary job is to stabilize the bottom of the abdominal cavity. The pelvis floor works with the transversus abdominus and multifidus to stabilize the pelvis. Kegel exercises are a great way to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.

The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle. It attaches to the ribs and spine. The diaphragm also forms the roof of the abdominal cavity, so it stabilizes the top of the abdominal cavity.

The internal oblique is the deeper of the 2 oblique muscles. It runs on an angle from the pelvis up to the ribs. Its primary role is in stabilizing the core, but it also helps to move the spine.

The transverso-spinalis muscles focus on segmental stability of the spine because they span just a few vertebrae in length. These muscles are also important for rotational stability.

All of the deep core muscles are important. When you perform exercises that require your spine to be stable, you challenge these core muscles. The plank exercise  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiA9j-dR0oM, bridges, alternate arm and leg raises, and the drawing in maneuver are examples of exercises that can increase core stability. Any exercise or piece of equipment that requires your muscles to work harder to keep your spine stable will increase the muscle work in the deep stabilization system of the core.

2) Superficial Movement System


When the pelvis moves, the hips move, and when the hip move, the lower back moves. If the pelvis is stable, the lower back and hip are stable, so any muscle that attaches to the pelvis is part of the core as well.

The latissimus dorsi (lats), which helps you do pull ups, is most often thought of as a back and shoulder muscle, but it also attaches to the upper border of the hip bone, (pelvis), lumbar vertebrae, thoracic vertebrae, and ribs. The lats can help to tilt the pelvis forwards or to the side, and it can negatively affect lower back posture when tight and inflexible.

The erector spinae are the group of muscles that people most commonly think of when they talk about lower back muscles. They are a group of superficial muscles that run the entire length of the spine. As the name suggests, these muscles help to keep the spine erect and they also pull the spine backwards. Every lower back exercise will place some emphasis on the erector spinae muscles.

The iliopsoas is the main hip flexor muscle. It attaches to the front of the lumbar spine and pelvis. It is primarily responsible for bending the hip, but it can also help to stabilize the pelvis, lower back, and hip.

The adductors are the muscles of the inner thigh. Most people don't think of the inner thigh muscles as core muscles, but all of the adductor muscles attach to the pubic bone, which is the front part of the pelvis. Because they attach to the pubic bone they can help to stabilize the pelvis, especially when standing on 1 leg.

The hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus) also attach to the pelvis. The gluteus medius and minimus are very important for hip stability, and they are especially important for stabilizing the hip and pelvis when standing on one leg. This is one of the reasons I say that balance exercises are so important in core training.

The hamstrings are the muscles on the back of the thigh, and they attach to the bottom of the pelvis. Strong hamstrings can help to anchor and stabilize the pelvis, and tight inflexible hamstrings can pull on the pelvis and negatively affect lower back posture.

The gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body and it attaches to the back of the pelvis. It extends thigh at the hip, and assists in laterally rotating the thigh. It works with the hamstrings to move the pelvis and also helps to stabilize the pelvis. Bridges can be considered a core exercise because it works the glutes while keeping the spine stable.

The external obliques attach to the ribs and pelvis but they are located superficially compared to the internal obliques. The external obliques are designed slightly more for moving the spine than stabilizing, but the external obliques  also help to stabilize the pelvis and lower back.

The rectus abdominus (6 pack)
is probably the most popular core muscle. It runs down the front of the spine, and it is the main muscle for flexing and bending. It is the main muscle for core exercises such as crunches and sit-ups.

So, what exercises, will help strengthen your core? Primarily we recommend yoga..http://www.springsyoga.com

and Pilates. We also know some private instructors if you need one. Just give us a call.


Dr. Saul and Staff


Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Internet Articles ,Kinetic Spine and Sports
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2012


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Brain Chemicals

Are you feeling more depressed than you think you should? Has your get up and go, got up and went? If so, you may be low in particular brain chemicals like Serotonin, GABA, Tyrosine or DPA.

Low Serotonin will make you feel like you are living under a dark cloud, while low tyrosine( an amino acid) will leave you feeling like you have the blah's. You may feel stressed out and could use some GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid). GABA acts to make the body more tranquil.  If you feel too sensitive to life's pains, you may be low in endorphins. This can be raised by a supplement call DPA. The good new is that these supplements may work as well or better than the common anti-depressants you see on TV with less side-effects!

If you would like to find out more, call LIly and she will send you the brain chemical analysis worksheet.

All the best,

Dr., Saul

PS..My son is getting married on Saturday the 5th of October and I am excited!

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Dr. Steven Saul, The Mood Cure, Julia Ross
Copyright: Dr. Steven Saul 2013


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Metabolic Syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome is a disorder of energy utilization and storage, diagnosed by a co-occurrence of 3 out of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal (central) obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density cholesterol (HDL) levels. Some studies have shown the prevalence  in the USA to be an estimated 34% of the adult population, and the prevalence increases with age.

Metabolic syndrome is also known as metabolic syndrome X, cardiometabolic syndrome, syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome, Reaven's syndrome, and CHAOS (in Australia).

Metabolic syndrome and prediabetes appears to be the same disorder, just diagnosed by a different set of biomarkers.

Your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke increases with the number of metabolic risk factors you have. In general, a person who has metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop heart disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone who doesn't have metabolic syndrome.

If you think you have this condition, we can help! Call us for information on the best supplements and dietary changes to help this condition!

All the best,
Dr. Saul

Author: Dr. Steven Saul
Source: Wikipedia, NIH
Copyright: Wikipedia, NIH 2014


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Tips To Stay Healthy During The Holiday Season

Whether you're scheduled for a long road trip, shopping for a small army of friends and family members, wrapping dozens and dozens of gifts or camping out in the kitchen to get all your cooking complete, major holidays can easily put your body at risk of injury. Prolonged sitting, prolonged standing, extensive walking, awkward positions, overeating and plain old mental exhaustion are all common when the holiday season comes into full swing. Here are a few common sense tips to assist in keeping you healthy and pain-free this holiday season:

  • Traveling: bring water and small snacks to stay well hydrated and to keep your blood sugar levels stable, wear comfortable shoes and clothing, bring along a small blanket and travel pillow, bring all required travel documents as well as any maps or reservations for rental cars and hotels, be careful and obtain assistance when handling heavy/bulky luggage and gifts - use a push cart or dolly and obtain assistance whenever appropriate and/or possible
  • Shopping: bring water and small snacks to stay well hydrated and to keep your blood sugar stable, wear comfortable shoes and clothing, have your shopping day pre-planned in regards to locations to visit and gifts to purchase, use shopping carts when available and take gifts to your vehicle frequently rather than risking injury by lugging pounds of gifts from store to store, be careful and obtain assistance when handling heavy/bulky gifts
  • Cooking: maintain proper posture while at the counter/sink, alternate between sitting and standing positions, take frequent breaks, stretch often, careful when using knives and other sharp objects
  • Gift Wrapping: maintain proper posture, stretch frequently, be careful not to leave scissors or sharp cutting objects on the floor where they can be accidentally stepped on or where they can be accessed by small children or animals, be careful and obtain assistance when moving or wrapping larger or bulky gifts
  • Holiday Eats and Treats: do your best to avoid over indulgence of those holiday eats and treats, maintain activity levels to counter act all that holiday feasting, avoid driving when you've consumed those holiday spirits
  • Treat Your Body To A Holiday Gift: if you find those aches and pains creeping in or just want to be in tiptop shape this holiday season, stop by your chiropractor's office and treat your body to the most valuable gift of all... the gift of health!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: ChiroPlanet.com
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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Chiropractic Profession Honors Veterans for Their Service


The men and women of our nation's Armed Forces make huge sacrifices in service to our country, including sacrifices to their health. This Veterans Day, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) would like to thank veterans for their service. Members of the military serve in austere conditions and routinely wear gear weighing up to 80 pounds. A February 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) report cites "diseases of Musculoskeletal System/Connective System," such as back pain as the No. 1 ailment of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans accessing VA treatment. Doctors of chiropractic (DCs) are experts in the treatment of neuromusculoskeletal problems and their natural approach can eliminate or reduce the need for drugs and surgery in some cases. Chiropractic’s non-drug approach is particularly important today in light of headlines about the rampant overuse and abuse of prescription opioid medications among troops. According to VA officials, more than 600,000 veterans use opioid painkillers, and experts say they often contribute to job loss, family strife, homelessness and suicide, as well as weight gain, diabetes and heart disease. The U.S. military is now investigating chiropractic services and other conservative treatment strategies to mitigate the alarming rate of opioid abuse and addiction among troops. Early results of that research (Goertz, Spine 2013) show that combining chiropractic manipulative treatment with medical care provides significant improvement in lessening pain and enhancing solider readiness. DCs are honored to serve veterans within the VA health care system and in local communities. ACA has worked diligently over the years to ensure that America’s veterans have access to chiropractic services. Today, more than 40 VA treatment facilities in the United States offer chiropractic care.


Author: American Chiropractic Association.
Source: ACAToday.com. November 11, 2014.
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association. 2014


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Increased Weight... Increased Cancer Risk

Most are aware of the negative effects that excess bodyweight has on the cardiovascular system, increasing the risk for heart disease, stroke and diabetes. However according to the WHO (World Health Organization), obesity and excessive weight are also responsible for half a million cancer cases annually. In North America, the number of diagnosed obesity-related cancers for 2012 was estimated at approximately 111,000. Cancers associated with increased bodyweight or BMI over 25 (body mass index) affect the esophagus, colon, rectum, kidney, pancreas, gallbladder, postmenopausal breast, ovary and endometrium. Fortunately the majority of us have control over our bodyweight with the decisions we make daily in regards to physical activity and dietary habits and choices.  Committing to regular and ongoing physical activity coupled with a healthy diet is the answer. Get up, get out, move around, watch what you eat and when you eat, and get and stay healthy!


Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Reuters. November 26, 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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